March 31 – Remembering Angie

by Marilea Rabasa

When Angie came out of that first rehab, she made me the most beautiful gift.

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“Mom, I’m not quite finished with it. I just have a few more flowers to cut. You’ll need to find a 17-by-22-inch frame to mount it on. Sorry it’s such an odd size. Guess I wasn’t thinking. I copied it from one of my Chinese art books. I hope you like it!”

Right now it’s hanging in my room for me to see. Over the years I’ve taken it on and off the wall, hidden it in a closet, too painful for me to look at. Maybe it’s a sign of my recovery. Now I can leave it on the wall, look at it, and appreciate all the work she put into it. This was her way, I believe, of telling me she loved me and she was sorry, not for getting sick, but for what that sickness drove her to do to me. She never, ever, was able to express her feelings easily with words. So she showed me, in countless ways, as she did once in December 1993.

“Where the hell is that $300 I put away for safekeeping? If you kids want any Christmas presents, you’d better help me find it now,” I shouted, panicking at the thought of losing my hard-earned cash. I was so scattered sometimes. I was perfectly capable of misplacing it.

“Found it, Mom! Don’t you remember when you hid it in this book? Well, here it is. Aren’t you glad I’m as honest as I am?”

“Yes, Angie, my darlin girl, I am. And thank you!”

Years are passing by, and sometimes it’s hard to remember her as she was. But when I look at the tapestry she made, I remember:

Angie had a fascination for all things Asian–Chinese, Japanese, it didn’t matter. She loved the grace and flow of much of the artwork. She copied a simple series of flowers. But she did it not with paint or pencil or pen; she cut out every pistil, not completely detailed, a few sepals in place, the rest scattered, all the ovaries in different colors for contrast, every leaf, in varying sizes and colors, every stem, and glued it all together on a piece of gold cloth. It looked just like the picture in her book.

I treasure this gift she made. The tapestry is twelve years old, and sometimes a petal comes unglued and I have to put it back on. I should put it under glass to preserve it. I wish we could put our children under glass–to keep them safe.

I would soon discover, though, that no matter what I did for Angie it would never be enough to protect her from the illness that was consuming her.”

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Marilea Rabasa grew up in New England. How she got to the Southwest is an interesting tale. For several years she was an ESL teacher in Virginia. Before that, she lived overseas in the Foreign Service. She may draw from my travels to write my sequel memoir. She lives with her partner in New Mexico now summers on Puget Sound.

Find her online at http://www.recoveryofthespirit.com/.

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4 responses to “March 31 – Remembering Angie

  1. I can truly imagine the heartbreak you both suffered.

    • Thank you, Letty. It has been hard, of course, to lose my beautiful daughter to this cruel disease. But I am learning, in my own recovery, that there can be a wonderful life and happiness on the other side of heartbreak. I’m very grateful to be living it.

  2. Heartfelt. Thanks for sharing this.

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